The following section includes data from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4), an independent state agency that collects information on all inpatient hospitalizations and ambulatory procedures at freestanding clinics in Pennsylvania to monitor health care cost. PHC4 also collects data on neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which is the main consequence of mothers who use opioids while pregnant. NAS is defined as a group of withdrawal symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, irritability, seizures, sweating, and tremors experienced by babies exposed to opioids in utero. Data are de-identified and include detailed patient demographic and utilization information. Each record has one principal diagnosis and up to 17 secondary diagnoses using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) for data from January 1, 2002 to September 31, 2015 and the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) from October 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015. Data shown in this section are complete through 2015 and are for Philadelphia residents that received care at a hospital in Philadelphia, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, or Montgomery County.

Inpatient discharges with a principal ICD-9-CM diagnosis code of V30-V39 or ICD-10-CM diagnosis code of Z38.0-Z38.8 were identified as live births. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) was identified using ICD-9-CM code 779.5 and ICD-10-CM code P96.1. Possible cases of iatrogenic NAS were identified and excluded from the analysis. Women hospitalized for a live-born delivery were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes V27.0, V27.2, V27.3, V27.5, and V27.6 and ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes Z37.0, Z37.2, Z37.3, Z37.5, and Z37.6. Of these women, those dependent on opioids (ICD-9-CM: 304.00-304.03; ICD-10-CM: F11.20-F11.29), using opioids (ICD-9-CM: 304.70-304.73; ICD-10-CM: F11.10-F11.29, F11.90-F11.99), and taking long-term methadone or other opiate analgesic (ICD-9-CM: V58.69; ICD-10-CM: Z79.891) were identified as a maternal hospitalization related to opioid abuse.

There are limitations to this dataset. First, the data is delayed up to two years. Second, all data is de-identified, and thus cannot be matched across city systems. Finally, although NAS is most often associated with opioid withdrawal, it can be used to describe withdrawal from other substances as well.

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Philadelphia TB Case Count, 2005/2016
Philadelphia TB Case Count, 2005/2016
Philadelphia TB Cases by Race and Ethnicity, 2010/2015

Maternal Opioid Use or Dependence


Hospitalizations Attributable to Opioid Poisoning by Year
TB Cases By Age Group, 2016
Hospitalizations Attributable to Opioid Poisoning by Year
Philadelphia TB Cases by Race and Ethnicity, 2010/2015